Classics Club Review – Utopia

In August I signed up for The Classics Spin #3. For the first spin I signed up for I got Peter Pan, which had been one of the books on my list that I was looking forward to read. This time, however, I got one that I anticipated not enjoying so much – Utopia by Thomas More. I did manage to complete it well before the finishing date of the spin, but my review is a few days late. Here is the review, as posted on GoodReads:

UtopiaUtopia by Thomas More

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I really didn’t know what to expect from Thomas More’s Utopia. I knew what the idea of utopia has become in the English language – an ideal place or state with perfect laws – and I was intrigued to see what this might be from the viewpoint of someone in the early 16th century.

In many ways Thomas More was way ahead of his time. I was interested to read his commentary early on in the book in regards to some of the laws in his day, especially those concerning stealing and murder. His thoughts on these were very enlightening.

This book is not a particularly long read, but it seemed so when I was reading it. I realize that this is more an indication of the time in which it was written than anything else, but in the end I was glad to get through it.

More’s Utopia is not a place that I would like to live. Although it may seem ideal to have such a utopian existence, I found that there seemed to be little room for creativity or any kind of individual thought. I think after a while that it would be a very boring place to live, but in the context of its day, then perhaps it would have been a vast improvement on life for many people of that time.

Utopia isn’t a bad book and I’m glad I took the opportunity to read it, but I don’t think it is one I will be returning to any time soon.

View all my reviews

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One thought on “Classics Club Review – Utopia

  1. I always imagine Utopia as a place like in Logan’s Run – supposedly wonderful, peaceful, luxurious, a life of ease but with an underbelly of something sinister (i.e. lack of old age)!

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