Wondrous Words Wednesday (Sept 18)

wondrous2Wondrous words Wednesday is a weekly meme where you can share new words that you’ve encountered or spotlight words you love. It’s hosted at the BermudaOnion’s Weblog. so head over there to see how you can participate.

I didn’t find any interesting words in my reading this week, but my wife probably found a few as she was laughing her way through The Giddy Limit Fifth Anniversary Book by Alex Leonard. This is a compilation of very funny comic strips written in the Orkney dialect. I grew up in Orkney and usually recognize most of the words, but just in case I don’t I have a copy of The Orcadian Dictionary close at hand. With this in mind, I thought I’d share a few Orcadian words with you this week.

DSCF1877Here are a few of my favourites:

hoodjiekaboogle (noun) – thingamabob

nitteran (adjective) – grumbling

peedie (adjective) – small

pernickety (adjective) – precise, fussy

snushan (adjective) – snorting, expelling air noisily through the nose

These are just the tip of the iceberg. I enjoy reading through the dictionary every now and again to see what words I may have forgotten or to discover ones I never really knew in the first place. Of the ones I shared, ‘peedie’ is probably the one I used the most and am sometimes still tempted to use. However, not many Canadians have any idea what it means, so I have to check myself.

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4 thoughts on “Wondrous Words Wednesday (Sept 18)

  1. I love that you shared these words today! We have an Irish friend and I was asking him about the Gaelic language this evening. He happened to mention that he can’t understand people from Scotland! These are great words!

    • That’s funny! Quite often when my dad visits here from Scotland I have to get him to slow down his speaking so people can understand him. I had to do the same thing when I first moved here as well. Thanks for dropping by and thanks also for hosting this awesome meme.

  2. What an interesting post. For some reason I know pernickety down here in Australia. We also use an expression arse about, which isn’t all that dissimilar from erse aboot (face), or at least how I imagine it would be said.

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